9 Responses

  1. Gaye Barnes
    Gaye Barnes at |

    As you said, everyone has their own recipe and I have mine that I am partial to. I will just add one suggestion that might make things easier for some. Instead of searing the meat on a griddle or frying pan, I place it under the broiler on a foil wrapped broiler pan for easier clean up. It sears it quite well without having the additional clean up of the stove and griddle.

    Also, I would have left a little more fat on the fat side of the brisket. It adds an immense amount of flavor. If you make the brisket the day before and if you refrigerate it overnight, all the fat will congeal in a solid piece on the top and can be easily removed before you reheat it to serve. This way you benefit from the flavor without any of the fat in the food. Whatever fat is left on the meat can be cut off before slicing.

    Reply
    1. Eatsporkjew.com
      Eatsporkjew.com at |

      Good suggestions! I have tried sealing the moisture in the meat with the oven, but I find it’s harder to control and requires watching the meat through the oven door like a hawk. But like you said, everyone has their own way.

      As far as fat…..the more the merrier, right?!

      Reply
  2. Mom
    Mom at |

    Your mother,me doesn’t always sear the meat, if it’s a really large brisket, I preheat the oven to 450 degrees and pop it in for 30 minutes. Then I reduce th oven to 325 for the next 4-6 hours. You can turn it down to 275 and let it cook overnite so it’ll be ready in the am. 7-8 hours later. Love you, mom

    Reply
    1. Eatsporkjew.com
      Eatsporkjew.com at |

      Thanks Mom! Just to confirm….if it’s a large brisket, are you saying you put it in the oven at 450 with the sauces, veggies, etc and just start the cooking process as I’ve outlined?

      Reply
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